The Super Bowl Mania: Who’s Watching What?

The Super Bowl undoubtedly is one of the biggest events in global sports and continues to draw huge viewership in America. But, football is also seeing a dip in its popularity. Piplsay (powered by Market Cube) surveyed 61,745 Americans nation-wide to understand the undercurrents and the euphoria that will define the Super Bowl this year. Football executives and brands can leverage this data in their decision making. For an in-depth analysis, download the full document here.

It’s passion, excitement, and nervousness all rolled into one. Super Bowl 2020 is less than a month away, and Americans are gearing up for the sporting extravaganza.

How many people will be watching the big game, and which teams will get the most fan support? Piplsay polled 61,745 Americans across the country to get all the exciting details. Here’s a summary of what we found:

“Super Bowl is too long and boring. I mostly watch the halftime show and check out a few ads on YouTube” – Mark

Other Insights

  • 73% of men plan to watch the Super Bowl, compared to 57% of women
  • 50% of women like commercials and half-time show, as compared to just 25% of men
  • Close to 60% of Millennials and Gen Zers report being influenced by Super Bowl commercials
  • 36% of Millennials say their football fascination has increased over time – highest amongst all age groups
  • 55% of Gen Zers think football is overshadowing other sports in America – highest amongst all age groups
  • Delaware residents (81%) are most excited about watching the Super Bowl, while Hawaii residents (60%) are least interested
“The game excites me most when, however, the commercials add to the enjoyment and often become a conversation point” – Darren

All Eyes On Super Sunday

A whopping 62% of football fans are planning to watch the Super Bowl next month, but 44% do not seem to know where the game will be played. It looks like the venue doesn’t matter, particularly when over 70% of fans are planning to watch the game from the comfort of their home.

With teams still jostling with each other for the top spots, it will be interesting to see who amongst them will emerge the winner. At the beginning of the season, defending champions, New England Patriots were the favorites to win the 2020 Super Bowl. The team, however, made a shocking exit after losing to the Tennessee Titans in the wild card round. Dallas Cowboys and New Orleans Saints, the other two favorites, also lost out before the divisional rounds. With most of the favorites not in the running, will fans be as excited about the Super Bowl? The viewership numbers post the event will surely tell.

Super Bowl Commercials

Commercials generally are never welcome, except when they are played during the Super Bowl. With over 50% of Americans (read millions) eagerly looking forward to these specially-created ads, it is no surprise that brands spend continue to spend an astonishing amount of money for these thirty seconds spot. In fact, our survey reveals that fans find Super bowl commercials much more interesting than the glamorous halftime show. That they are a big deal can be gauged from the fact that a whopping 45% of Americans say that these ads often influence their brand affinity.

“My love for football took a nosedive when they allowed players to kneel on the sidelines” – Robert
“My football fascination has decreased because of increasingly ridiculous and controversial behavior by NFL players” – Shawn

Football losing its Mojo?

Once a universally-loved sport, football is said to be slowly losing its appeal. While 17% of Piplsay respondents say that their interest in football has decreased over the years, another 27% of Americans, including 23% of women, say that their love for the game has only increased.

Among reasons for its declining popularity, close to 30% of Americans feel that football has become too political, while another 19% of people are put off by the domestic abuse controversies surrounding the players. On the other hand, football’s violent nature, which is often said to be its biggest drawback, figures last on our list.

Also, given the hype and focus around the three big leagues in the country, it is not surprising that a good 43% of Americans think that football overshadows other sports in the country.

Survey Methodology: This Piplsay survey (powered by Market Cube) was conducted nationwide in the US in the month of January 2020. We received 61,745 responses from individuals aged 18 years and older.

For deeper insights, download the detailed research report here
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